Education

B.A., Zoology: University of California, Berkeley, 1968.

M.A., Biology: University of Oregon, 1969.

Ph.D., Biology: Boston University, 1991. Dr. R. B. Primack, thesis advisor. Thesis topic: "The Evolution and Natural History of Ginkgo biloba L." Research on this project extended over a three year period and involved travel to eastern China (fall of 1989) and to South Carolina.

Professional and Administrative Experience

Senior Research Scientist, Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
(July 2003 to present)
In this capacity, I am in charge of developing a research program utilizing the living collections of the Arnold Arboretum, focusing on ecological monitoring issues, including phenology, invasive species, soil conditions, pathology, and hydrology. I am also utilizing the Arboretum’s collections for research on the taxonomy and cultivation of specific plant genera, notably Tsuga and Stewartia.

Lecturer, Harvard University Graduate School of Design (1992 to present)
Since 1992, I have had an appointment as a lecturer, which initially involved teaching a seven-week course “Plants and Design” to second year graduate students in Landscape Architecture at the GSD. I am still teaching the course today, which covers plant identification, plant ecology, and site evaluation. In the fall of 2000 and 2001, I taught a course on “Sustainable Landscapes.” Since the fall of 2003, I have been working half-time at the GSD, and am now teaching one full semester course: “Rebuilding Devastated Landscapes” (fall) and a new module on soils to second year students (“Plants and Technology II”).

Director of Living Collections of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
(May 1992 to July 2003)
I managed the Living Collections Department, consisting of eight staff members and fourteen unionized grounds crew working in maintenance, propagation, and plant records sub-departments. Ultimately I was responsible for overseeing all aspects of planning, development, and maintenance for the Arboretum's collections, spread out over 265 acres, and consisting of some 17,000 accessioned plants. The primary purpose of these collections is scientific in nature, and my responsibility was to oversee their research use by Arboretum staff as well as by scientists from other academic institutions. My own interests during this time period included the morphology and ecology of sprouting in gymnosperms; the development of form in woody plants; and the growth and physiology of plant root systems.
As a representative of the Arboretum, I have participated in eight plant collecting expeditions to China: to Hubei Province in central China (1994), to Zhejiang Province in eastern China to study Ginkgo biloba (1989 and 1995), to Jilin Province in northeast China (1997), to Guizhou Province to observe Ginkgo biloba growing in the wild (2002), to Jiangxi Province in central China to collect Stewartia (2004), to Sichuan Province in southwest China (2005), and to Chongqing Province to study wild Ginkgo (2007). I have also collected a wide variety of plants in various parts of North America.

Editor of Arnoldia, the Magazine of the Arnold Arboretum (1989 to April 1992)
I was responsible for coordinating all phases of the production of this quarterly publication, from soliciting, editing, and writing articles to supervising design, printing, and distribution. In all, I produced fourteen issues of Arnoldia.

Assistant Plant Propagator, Arnold Arboretum (1979 to 1989)
I participated in all aspects of the operation of the Dana Greenhouses and nurseries. I specialized in propagation of woody plants from seed, cuttings, and grafting, and have published on a wide variety of plants at the Arboretum.

Research Technician, Cabot Foundation Laboratories, Harvard Forest, Petersham, Mass. (1972 to 1977)
I was in charge of operating the laboratories and greenhouses and participated in research investigating nitrogen-fixation by non-leguminous trees and shrubs, primarily Comptonia peregrina, the sweet fern. The work culminated with the first successful isolation and in vitro cultivation of an actinobacteria in the genus Frankia. I also worked on the biology of seeds buried in forested soils.

Curator of the Larz Anderson Bonsai Collection (1982 to present)
In this capacity, I have been responsible for all aspects of the care and maintenance of this collection of bonsai trees, which is of the most historically significant bonsai collections in North America.

Awards

Awarded a Bullard Fellowship in Forest Research from the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts, where I was in residence from September 1, 1999 through March 1, 2000.

Winner of the Arthur Hoyt Scott Medal and Award for 1999, presented annually by the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College to either an individual or organization “in recognition of their outstanding national contributions to the science and art of gardening.”

Winner of the Jackson Dawson Medal for 1986, awarded by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for "skill in the science and practice of hybridization and propagation of plants."

Education

B.A., Zoology: University of California, Berkeley, 1968.

M.A., Biology: University of Oregon, 1969.

Ph.D., Biology: Boston University, 1991. Dr. R. B. Primack, thesis advisor. Thesis topic: "The Evolution and Natural History of Ginkgo biloba L." Research on this project extended over a three year period and involved travel to eastern China (fall of 1989) and to South Carolina.

Professional and Administrative Experience

Senior Research Scientist, Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
(July 2003 to present)
In this capacity, I am in charge of developing a research program utilizing the living collections of the Arnold Arboretum, focusing on ecological monitoring issues, including phenology, invasive species, soil conditions, pathology, and hydrology. I am also utilizing the Arboretum’s collections for research on the taxonomy and cultivation of specific plant genera, notably Tsuga and Stewartia.

Lecturer, Harvard University Graduate School of Design (1992 to present)
Since 1992, I have had an appointment as a lecturer, which initially involved teaching a seven-week course “Plants and Design” to second year graduate students in Landscape Architecture at the GSD. I am still teaching the course today, which covers plant identification, plant ecology, and site evaluation. In the fall of 2000 and 2001, I taught a course on “Sustainable Landscapes.” Since the fall of 2003, I have been working half-time at the GSD, and am now teaching one full semester course: “Rebuilding Devastated Landscapes” (fall) and a new module on soils to second year students (“Plants and Technology II”).

Director of Living Collections of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
(May 1992 to July 2003)
I managed the Living Collections Department, consisting of eight staff members and fourteen unionized grounds crew working in maintenance, propagation, and plant records sub-departments. Ultimately I was responsible for overseeing all aspects of planning, development, and maintenance for the Arboretum's collections, spread out over 265 acres, and consisting of some 17,000 accessioned plants. The primary purpose of these collections is scientific in nature, and my responsibility was to oversee their research use by Arboretum staff as well as by scientists from other academic institutions. My own interests during this time period included the morphology and ecology of sprouting in gymnosperms; the development of form in woody plants; and the growth and physiology of plant root systems.
As a representative of the Arboretum, I have participated in eight plant collecting expeditions to China: to Hubei Province in central China (1994), to Zhejiang Province in eastern China to study Ginkgo biloba (1989 and 1995), to Jilin Province in northeast China (1997), to Guizhou Province to observe Ginkgo biloba growing in the wild (2002), to Jiangxi Province in central China to collect Stewartia (2004), to Sichuan Province in southwest China (2005), and to Chongqing Province to study wild Ginkgo (2007). I have also collected a wide variety of plants in various parts of North America.

Editor of Arnoldia, the Magazine of the Arnold Arboretum (1989 to April 1992)
I was responsible for coordinating all phases of the production of this quarterly publication, from soliciting, editing, and writing articles to supervising design, printing, and distribution. In all, I produced fourteen issues of Arnoldia.

Assistant Plant Propagator, Arnold Arboretum (1979 to 1989)
I participated in all aspects of the operation of the Dana Greenhouses and nurseries. I specialized in propagation of woody plants from seed, cuttings, and grafting, and have published on a wide variety of plants at the Arboretum.

Research Technician, Cabot Foundation Laboratories, Harvard Forest, Petersham, Mass. (1972 to 1977)
I was in charge of operating the laboratories and greenhouses and participated in research investigating nitrogen-fixation by non-leguminous trees and shrubs, primarily Comptonia peregrina, the sweet fern. The work culminated with the first successful isolation and in vitro cultivation of an actinobacteria in the genus Frankia. I also worked on the biology of seeds buried in forested soils.

Curator of the Larz Anderson Bonsai Collection (1982 to present)
In this capacity, I have been responsible for all aspects of the care and maintenance of this collection of bonsai trees, which is of the most historically significant bonsai collections in North America.

Awards

Awarded a Bullard Fellowship in Forest Research from the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts, where I was in residence from September 1, 1999 through March 1, 2000.

Winner of the Arthur Hoyt Scott Medal and Award for 1999, presented annually by the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College to either an individual or organization “in recognition of their outstanding national contributions to the science and art of gardening.”

Winner of the Jackson Dawson Medal for 1986, awarded by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for "skill in the science and practice of hybridization and propagation of plants."